Michelle Taylor - TR

Critiques of TR related Journal entries


Critiques by me
"How Family Leisure Influences Family Functionality in Single-Parent Families"
Critique
Article

"Therapeutic Recreation - A Conceptual Criticism"
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Article

"Health-related quality of life changes of children and adolescents with chronic disease after participation in therapeutic recreation camping program"
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Article


Critiques by peers


"Riding the Waves: Therapeutic Surfing to Improve Social Skills for Children with Autism"
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Article

In summary of Meagan Berry’s critique, children with autism often have difficulty forming and maintaining meaningful relationships with peers, leading to social isolation and often resulting in negative impacts on emotional and cognitive development, academic achievements, and self-esteem. Surfing is a modality that has been used to help these individuals overcome such challenges. Researchers have used surveys and test to gauge levels of improvement of the participants in surfing interventions, and the author offered a plan to help a CTRS implement surfing therapy. Little scientific evidence has been gathered regarding the benefits of surfing therapy, although participants and their family members have given positive feedback. Surfing therapy has helped them gain greater confidence in their skills and abilities and provided opportunities for them to develop their social and leadership skills as they interact with other participants and help teach each other.

"Using Theater and Drama Interventions to Reduce Bullying in School-Aged Children"
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Article

Violence and bullying in schools seems to be a growing epidemic, especially because of increased access to social media, and some experts have begun using theater and drama in the classroom to confront the issue. The dramas allowed children to see certain bullying scenarios played out, play a role in the scenarios, and then process their reactions in an emotionally safe environment. Positive results have been reported, though they are not specifically mentioned. Using this kind of therapy in a more casual setting, like a classroom, helps children feel more comfortable getting involved. The plays also educate them on how to confront bullying (e.g how to act when they witness bullying, and how to act if they are bullied) and helps them gain confidence to confront it. For the participants, acting and taking on roles can reveal deeper emotions and help them feel comfortable expressing their feelings.

"Karaoke for Quads: A new application of an old recreation with potential therapeutic benefits for people with disabilities"
Critique
Article

This article presents the possible benefits of using karaoke to help people with disabilities, specifically addressing the needs of quadriplegics. Because people with quadriplegia are not able to participate in many recreational activities, the authors suggested that karaoke may offer them a similar opportunity to be involved. Karaoke may improve the participants’ respiratory system, and singing is likely to positively influence personal satisfaction and physical and emotional relief. The authors of the article offer some conjectures and presumptions as fact, without providing evidence of their claims. Implementing karaoke in a therapeutic setting and analyzing the effects on the participants would be beneficial to back up the theoretical claims made in the article. Using karaoke as a modality in therapeutic recreation could be very effective and would be fairly easy to implement, involving low overall costs.

"'It Gives Me Purpose': The Use of Dance with People Experiencing Homelessness"
Critique
Article

The authors of this article discuss the use of a recreational dance program in a homeless shelter to decrease stress and increase self-determination and positivity. Because homelessness causes people to go into survival mode, the recreation and leisure needs of those experiencing it are usually not met. Homeless shelters generally focus on meeting basic needs of the residents, and although leisure opportunities could encourage positive coping skills and increase the quality of life and autonomy of participants, very few of these opportunities are available to residents of homeless shelters. Participants in the dance classes at the homeless shelters were evaluated before, during, and after participation, and the researchers found the intervention successful because participants reported more positive feelings and less stress after participating in the dance classes. The sample size was small because only eleven individuals participated in the program, and none of them could attend the dance class for more than four weeks. Future studies on using dance to help underprivileged people would be very useful to discovering how such programs could be implemented in more locations.